T3

T3

Robot 2008

astounding, high-tech features on this 50’s style tin robot. Includes 2 light up ray guns, a rotating body and a small red light on his head. From the Science Museum Shop.

Brush Robot

This build-it-yourself robotic dust robot will autonomously sweep up detritus – or at least move it around a bit – whilst amusing your sibling with bobbly eyes.

Rubik Speaker

USB-powered speaker plugs in via 3.5mm jack and then dishes out songs and nostalgia

PSN Europe

PSN Europe

Be your own Bond with a Science Museum Spy Pen

The latest James Bond film, Skyfall, opens at cinemas on 26 October. But why should 007 have all the espionage-based fun?

Get yourself along to the Science Museum shop, and you can do your own bit for the well-being of the nation (cough) with this miniature camera, disguised as a fully working pen.

“If you need a spy camera that’s body mounted, there’s nothing easier or more discreet than just putting this pen camcorder in a shirt pocket for a full view of everything you see in front of you,” says Triple M (that’s short for ‘museum marketing manager’). “Just clip it to your pocket and walk around somewhere that you want to film, or leave it in place to record a face-to-face conversation.”

The Spy Pen (£50) has 2GB of internal memory and will store up to 15 hours of video footage (640 by 480 pixels – according to our intelligence reports) while recording audio as a 128kbps PCM file. A concealed USB connector enables you to recharge the device and transfer files to a laptop. And – yes! – you can actually use it for writing letters to megalomaniac villains too. Basildon Bond meets James Bond in one gadget, you could say.

“If you’re in a tight spot or time is crucial, you could have a covert recording made, then attached to an email or uploaded to the internet within minutes,” advises our Top Level Briefing Dossier. Which we have subsequently shredded for security purposes.

To see the full article click here.

Geek News Central

Geek News Central

Geeks of a certain age will undoubtedly remember when the Rubik’s Cube craze (or Magic Cube as it was originally known) spread through school playgrounds in the early 1980s. Building on the current popularity of all things retro, this Rubik’s Cube Speaker will bring back memories of success or frustration depending on whether you were able to solve the puzzle or not. The Cube speaker uses the USB connector for power and the 3.5 mm jack for the audio, so there’s no batteries or power adaptor required. Unsurprisingly the speaker is NOT a functioning Rubik’s Cube but you can try and impress your friends by saying that you solved it…until they spot the cables.

To see the full article click here.

Lego Lunchbox

Lego Lunchbox

As we fast approach the end of the school holidays, thoughts will be turning to the often stressful task of kitting the kids out ready for the new term.

They will no doubt have grown out of there school uniforms and shoes, and become and become board with there stationary. Well , who can blame them, remember how exciting it was choosing your new pencil case and lunchbox was? Some of the items below almost make me wish i was going back to school in september too.

As featured in the: Staffordshire newsletter, Ashbourne new telegraph, Leek post and times, Nuneaton news,          Uttoxeter advertiser post & times and the Burton mail.